Adekunle Jimoh, Ilorin

Kwara state Sector Commander of the Federal Road Safety Corps Jonathan Owoade Wednesday said that the command recorded no fewer than 107 road carnages in the state in September 2020.

He added that 32 persons died during the crashes, which involved 174 persons with 75 sustaining various degrees of injuries.

Mr. Owoade told reporters in Ilorin, the state capital as part of the command and Driving Schools Association of Nigeria (DSAN)’s activities to mark this year’s African Road Safety Day in the state.

He said the carnages involved 29 vehicles.

The sector commander revealed that the command had put in place community first responders in crash-prone corridors in the state to attend to crash victims before the arrival of FRSC officials.

“The community first responders have been trained by the Red Society of Nigeria on how to rescue road crash victims,” he said.

The FRSC boss hinted that the “command is carrying out free vehicle safety checks as part of an effort to reduce carnages on the highways to the barest minimum during these ‘ember’ months.”

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He raised the alarm that some motorists have cultivated the habit of using fake number plates and cutting of plastic as number plates.

He said: “We are appealing to road users in Kwara state to take driving easy. Life has no duplicate. Easy does it.

We have observed in the state that when commercial cabs are on the roads, they stay right at the centre of the road thus impeding two vehicles from moving at the same time. We need to walk on this attitude.

“When we are on the road we should try as much as possible to maintain lane discipline. Commercial cabs are not supposed to be on the fast lane because of the way they carry and drop passengers. They are supposed to be on the service lane.

“Vehicles on emergency are supposed to be on the fast lane and it is incumbent on other road users to give them right of way. I want all to join hands with us to put an end to unnecessary carnages on our highways.”

The Nation